Preparedness Assessment

Assess your own disaster logistics preparedness with our short Preparedness Assessment! It only takes 5-10 minutes, and you’ll get instant feedback and recommendations on how to improve your disaster logistics capability, including a list of action items tailored to your needs, and links to helpful resource documents.

  1. 1.

    Are you responsible for managing disaster logistics operations for your agency or organization?

     

    Learn more about disaster logistics and the universal logistics standard in the Disaster Logistics Capstone and Concept of Operations (CONOPS) documents. You may want to consider sharing these documents with the individual or team responsible for disaster logistics in your jurisdiction.

    Refer to the Disaster Logistics Capstone and Concept of Operations (CONOPS) documents to learn more about the Universal Logistics Standard, and compare your CONOPS and disaster logistics program against this standard; feel free to borrow content, or let us know if there is something we’ve missed.

  2. 2.

    Large-scale incidents can quickly overwhelm a jurisdictions logistics capability. Does your jurisdiction have a plan in place to expand the logistics section of your emergency operations center (EOC) in response to a large-scale or catastrophic incident?

      

    Create a plan for your jurisdiction to expand its logistics section in response to a large-scale incident. You will need to identify facilities, staff and resources to support this expansion. The Logistics Center Plan is one resource you can use to guide you through this process.

    1. 2.1

      Are there personnel in your jurisdiction who know how to manage resource requests and are trained to work as supplemental staff in your logistics section if needed?

        

      Consider training personnel from other agencies or volunteer organizations to be able to support logistics operations in your emergency operations center (EOC). Find basic information on the resource request process in the Resource Management and Movement Control sections of the Logistics Center Plan. For information on training developed by the Regional Logistics Program, go to www.EmergencyLogistics.org/Training.

    1. 2.1

      Have you identified a location that will support the needs of your expanded logistics section?

        

      Identify a location ahead of time that will support your expanded logistics section. Refer to Operational Strategy 1, Facility Selection in the Logistics Center Plan to get started.

    2. 2.2

      Have you determined staffing requirements and have a plan to activate and deploy personnel to staff your expanded logistics section?

        

      Determine how many staff members you will need to support a potential expansion of your logistics section and where these staff will come from ahead of time. Refer to Operational Strategy 2, Staff Identification and Deployment in the Logistics Center Plan to get started.

    3. 2.3

      Are there personnel in your jurisdiction who know how to manage resource requests and are trained to work as supplemental staff in your logistics section if needed?

        

      Consider training personnel from other agencies or volunteer organizations to be able to support logistics operations in your emergency operations center (EOC). Find basic information on the resource request process in the Resource Management and Movement Control sections of the Logistics Center Plan. For information on training developed by the Regional Logistics Program, go to www.EmergencyLogistics.org/Training.

    4. 2.4

      Have you determined what supplies and equipment will be needed to support your expanded logistics section?

        

      Determine supplies and equipment required to support a potential expansion of your logistics section ahead of time. Refer to Operational Strategy 3, Resource Requirements in the Logistics Center Plan to get started.

  3. 3.

    Does your jurisdiction have a plan for activating, running and demobilizing commodity points of distribution, where life-sustaining commodities such as food and water can be distributed to members of the public? 

      

    Create a plan for your jurisdiction to set up and run commodity points of distribution if private sector supply chains are disrupted. You may run this operation from your emergency operations center (EOC) or identify a lead agency to manage the operation, and should plan ahead to identify sites and determine potential staffing and resource requirements. Refer to the Commodity Point of Distribution Plan to get started.

    1. 3.1

      Have you identified sites where commodity points of distribution (C-PODs) can be set up?

        

      Pre-identify locations where you can distribute commodities and assess each site. Refer to Appendix A of the Commodity Point of Distribution Plan to get started.

      1. 3.1.1

        Have you assessed your pre-identified commodity distribution sites?

          

        Assess each of your potential commodity distribution sites. Find a site assessment survey form in Appendix A of the Commodity Point of Distribution Plan.

    2. 3.2

      Has you jurisdiction designated an individual or lead agency to activate and run commodity distribution operations when required?

        

      C-PODs should only ever be activated in extreme situations, when a disaster is of such a large magnitude that it disrupts private sector supply chains for longer than a few hours. In this situation, the EOC is likely to be very busy coordinating the disaster response. Consider seeing if another agency in your jurisdiction is willing to take responsibility for getting commodity distribution operations up and running following a catastrophe and have a representative of your emergency management agency (EMA) work with that agency to pre-identify staff and resources. Refer to Operational Strategy 2, Staff Identification and Deployment in the Commodity Point of Distribution Plan to get started.

    3. 3.3

      Have you determined what supplies and equipment will be needed to support commodity distribution operations?

        

      Determine supplies and equipment required to support commodity distribution operations ahead of time. Refer to Operational Strategy 3, Resource Requirements in the Commodity Point of Distribution Plan to get started.

    4. 3.4

      Have you determined what types and quantities of commodities will be required to support your population following a catastrophe?

        

      Estimate the potential need for commodities in your jurisdiction following a catastrophe. You may use census data and information from previous incidents to make these estimates. You may also refer to Operational Strategy 4, Commodity Requirements in the Commodity Point of Distribution Plan.

  4. 4.

    Does your jurisdiction have a plan for activating, running and demobilizing staging areas or receiving and distribution centers, where critical resources coming into your jurisdiction can be staged before continuing on to their final point of destination?

      

    Create a plan for your jurisdiction to set up and run receiving and distribution centers (RDCs) in extreme cases when you may need to supplement federal staging operations. RDCs will typically only be run by states or very large cities or counties. Refer to the Receiving and Distribution Center Plan to get started.

    1. 4.1

      Have you identified sites for receiving and distribution centers (RDCs)?

        

      Pre-identify locations that can be used as receiving and distribution centers or staging areas and assess each site. Refer to Appendix E of the Receiving and Distribution Center Plan to get started.

      1. 4.1.1

        Have you assessed your pre-identified receiving and distribution center sites?

          

        Assess each of your potential receiving and distribution or staging sites. Find a site assessment survey form in Appendix E of the Receiving and Distribution Center Plan.

    2. 4.2

      Has you jurisdiction designated an individual to activate and run staging operations when required?

        

      Consider assigning an EMA staff member to be responsible for getting staging operations up and running following a catastrophe. Refer to Operational Strategy 2, Staff Identification and Mobilization in the Receiving and Distribution Center Plan to get started.

    3. 4.3

      Have you determined what supplies and equipment will be needed to support staging operations?

        

      Determine supplies and equipment required to support commodity distribution operations ahead of time. Refer to Operational Strategy 3, Resource Requirements in the Receiving and Distribution Center Plan to get started.

  5. 5.

    Does your jurisdiction or your Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (VOAD) or Community Organizations Active in Disaster (COAD) have a plan for managing spontaneous (unaffiliated) volunteers and unsolicited donations? 

      

    Work with your Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (VOAD) or Community Organizations Active in Disaster (COAD) partners to create a plan for your jurisdiction to manage spontaneous volunteers and unsolicited donations. Refer to Appendix A in the Volunteer and Donations Management Plan to get started.

    1. 5.1

      Have you identified individuals or teams to coordinate volunteer and donations management efforts after an incident?

        

      Work with local Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (VOAD) or Community Organizations Active in Disaster (COAD) partners to identify key personnel to lead volunteer and donations management efforts after an incident. Refer to Operational Strategy 2, Staff Identification and Deployment in the Volunteer and Donations Management Plan to get started.

    2. 5.2

      Have you identified facilities that may be used as call centers, volunteer reception centers, donations warehouses or other volunteer and donations management functions?

        

      Work with local VOAD/COAD partners to pre-identify facilities that can be used to support volunteer and donations management operations. Refer to Operational Strategy 1, Facility Selection in the Volunteer and Donations Management Plan to get started

    3. 5.3

      Do you know what resources and capabilities are available to support volunteer and donations management in your jurisdiction and have you identified gaps in those resources or capabilities?

        

      Work with local VOAD/COAD partners to pre-identify resources and capabilities available to you to support volunteer and donations management operations. Then work together to identify possible gaps in resources or services. Refer to Operational Strategy 3, Resource Requirements and Appendix A in the Volunteer and Donations Management Plan to get started.

    4. 5.4

      Does your jurisdiction have a volunteer website?

        

      Work with local VOAD/COAD partners to establish a volunteer website. Consider building on one of the VOAD/COAD members’ existing sites or using one of the sites identified in Appendix E of the Volunteer and Donations Management Plan and determine who will be responsible for maintaining and updating the website.

    5. 5.5

      Do you have a media strategy to deal with volunteers and donations during a disaster?

        

      Work with local VOAD/COAD partners and your Public Information Officer (PIO) to establish a media strategy for dealing with volunteers and donations when a disaster strikes. You should develop key message points and various public messaging forms and templates ahead of time so that you are ready to address volunteer and donations issues immediately after a disaster strikes. Refer to Operational Strategy 4, Public Messaging in the Volunteer and Donations Management Plan to get started.

  6. 6.

    Does your jurisdiction maintain a list or database of all its resources? 

      

    Create a database where you can list all available resources in your agency or jurisdiction and assign someone to maintain and periodically update the list. Refer to the Regional Asset Database Project Assessment Paper to get started

    1. 6.1

      Resource typing is the categorization and description of response resources that are commonly exchanged in disaster through mutual aid agreements. Have you typed all of the resources in your database?

        

      Resource typing definitions can give emergency responders the information they need to make sure they request and receive the appropriate resources during an emergency or disaster. You can find information on categorizing common data points in the Regional Asset Database Project Assessment Paper.

  7. 7.

    Credentialing is the process of establishing the qualifications of licensed professionals and assessing their background and legitimacy. Do the badges issued to first responders and other emergency management personnel in your jurisdiction contain information on each individual’s credentials?

      

    Credentialing is especially important when a jurisdiction requests outside assistance following a disaster and needs to be able to identify and validate the credentials presented by responding emergency response officials (EROs) before giving them access to resources, sites and/or systems. Refer to the Disaster Logistics Credentialing Document for credentialing information and best practices from throughout the NY-NJ-CT-PA Region, as well as an overview of the identification and credentialing standards for federal employees and contractors.

  8. 8.

    Does your jurisdiction have plans or mechanisms in place to allow you to work with private sector partners in response in large-scale incidents? 

      

    After a catastrophe the public sector may not be able to provide all of the required resources and services, making public-private partnerships critical to an effective and efficient response. Prepare to partner with the private sector by establishing a coordination team to develop relationships and establish expectations and needs from both parties. Refer to the Preparedness Tasks Checklist in the Public-Private Sector Partnership Document to get started

 

Thank you for completing the preparedness assessment.